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2019.11.02 - 2020.02.16

The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

Sarah Lucas

2019.11.02 - 2020.02.16

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The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

2019.07.19 - 2019.10.13

The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

Thousand-Armed Guanyin

2019.07.19 - 2019.10.13

+

The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

2019.04.27 - 2019.06.26

The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

Your footsteps are the road, for there is no road

2019.04.27 - 2019.06.26

+

The Red Brick Art Museum will remain open
On Monday, November 11th
Opening Hours:
10:00-17:30 (last entry at 17:00)

Collection

Realm of Reverberations
Realm of Reverberations

Chen Chieh-Jen

1 / 4

Realm of Reverberations

2014

Installation, video,Four-channel video installation

About 20 minutes for each continuous loop

In 1994, Taipei City Government’s Department of Rapid Transit Systems designated the Losheng Sanitarium – formerly used to forcibly quarantine lepers during the Japanese Colonial Period (1930) – as the building site for the city’s Xinzhuang Metro Depot. In an effort to defend their land, current residents of the Sanitarium responded in 1997 by organizing an anti-eviction campaign. In 2002, the Department proceeded with the first phase of tearing down the sanitarium’s premises, immediately triggering heated opposition from both leprosy patients and protesters from all walks of life. The Losheng Preservation Movement soon came into full swing. In addition to the local residents’ self-organized Losheng Self-Help Organization and the student-organized Youth Alliance for Losheng, numerous scholars, lawyers, engineers and cultural workers also devoted themselves to the campaign. In early 2008, after the police had constrained the residents, students and the mob protesting the removal, the Department of Rapid Transit Systems immediately erected a construction barricade, and having torn down 90% of the residential area, they commenced with excavation and construction….

When the Losheng Sanitarium was destroyed five years later, its remnants and the depot’s massive construction site took on the appearance of juxtaposed scars, seeming to be a site where trauma and “the greed of development” had overlapped. By referring to the divergent viewpoints of young females who have accompanied the sanitarium’s residents for years, elderly residents and health care workers from the Mainland – along with fictionalized political prisoners – Realm of Reverberations discusses a key issue, as the incident seems to be “foregone conclusion”: that is, whether “a foregone conclusion” necessarily constitutes “a final outcome”.

2 / 4

Realm of Reverberations

2014

Installation, video,Four-channel video installation

About 20 minutes for each continuous loop

In 1994, Taipei City Government’s Department of Rapid Transit Systems designated the Losheng Sanitarium – formerly used to forcibly quarantine lepers during the Japanese Colonial Period (1930) – as the building site for the city’s Xinzhuang Metro Depot. In an effort to defend their land, current residents of the Sanitarium responded in 1997 by organizing an anti-eviction campaign. In 2002, the Department proceeded with the first phase of tearing down the sanitarium’s premises, immediately triggering heated opposition from both leprosy patients and protesters from all walks of life. The Losheng Preservation Movement soon came into full swing. In addition to the local residents’ self-organized Losheng Self-Help Organization and the student-organized Youth Alliance for Losheng, numerous scholars, lawyers, engineers and cultural workers also devoted themselves to the campaign. In early 2008, after the police had constrained the residents, students and the mob protesting the removal, the Department of Rapid Transit Systems immediately erected a construction barricade, and having torn down 90% of the residential area, they commenced with excavation and construction….

When the Losheng Sanitarium was destroyed five years later, its remnants and the depot’s massive construction site took on the appearance of juxtaposed scars, seeming to be a site where trauma and “the greed of development” had overlapped. By referring to the divergent viewpoints of young females who have accompanied the sanitarium’s residents for years, elderly residents and health care workers from the Mainland – along with fictionalized political prisoners – Realm of Reverberations discusses a key issue, as the incident seems to be “foregone conclusion”: that is, whether “a foregone conclusion” necessarily constitutes “a final outcome”.

3 / 4

Realm of Reverberations

2014

Installation, video,Four-channel video installation

About 20 minutes for each continuous loop

In 1994, Taipei City Government’s Department of Rapid Transit Systems designated the Losheng Sanitarium – formerly used to forcibly quarantine lepers during the Japanese Colonial Period (1930) – as the building site for the city’s Xinzhuang Metro Depot. In an effort to defend their land, current residents of the Sanitarium responded in 1997 by organizing an anti-eviction campaign. In 2002, the Department proceeded with the first phase of tearing down the sanitarium’s premises, immediately triggering heated opposition from both leprosy patients and protesters from all walks of life. The Losheng Preservation Movement soon came into full swing. In addition to the local residents’ self-organized Losheng Self-Help Organization and the student-organized Youth Alliance for Losheng, numerous scholars, lawyers, engineers and cultural workers also devoted themselves to the campaign. In early 2008, after the police had constrained the residents, students and the mob protesting the removal, the Department of Rapid Transit Systems immediately erected a construction barricade, and having torn down 90% of the residential area, they commenced with excavation and construction….

When the Losheng Sanitarium was destroyed five years later, its remnants and the depot’s massive construction site took on the appearance of juxtaposed scars, seeming to be a site where trauma and “the greed of development” had overlapped. By referring to the divergent viewpoints of young females who have accompanied the sanitarium’s residents for years, elderly residents and health care workers from the Mainland – along with fictionalized political prisoners – Realm of Reverberations discusses a key issue, as the incident seems to be “foregone conclusion”: that is, whether “a foregone conclusion” necessarily constitutes “a final outcome”.

4 / 4

Realm of Reverberations

2014

Installation, video,Four-channel video installation

About 20 minutes for each continuous loop

In 1994, Taipei City Government’s Department of Rapid Transit Systems designated the Losheng Sanitarium – formerly used to forcibly quarantine lepers during the Japanese Colonial Period (1930) – as the building site for the city’s Xinzhuang Metro Depot. In an effort to defend their land, current residents of the Sanitarium responded in 1997 by organizing an anti-eviction campaign. In 2002, the Department proceeded with the first phase of tearing down the sanitarium’s premises, immediately triggering heated opposition from both leprosy patients and protesters from all walks of life. The Losheng Preservation Movement soon came into full swing. In addition to the local residents’ self-organized Losheng Self-Help Organization and the student-organized Youth Alliance for Losheng, numerous scholars, lawyers, engineers and cultural workers also devoted themselves to the campaign. In early 2008, after the police had constrained the residents, students and the mob protesting the removal, the Department of Rapid Transit Systems immediately erected a construction barricade, and having torn down 90% of the residential area, they commenced with excavation and construction….

When the Losheng Sanitarium was destroyed five years later, its remnants and the depot’s massive construction site took on the appearance of juxtaposed scars, seeming to be a site where trauma and “the greed of development” had overlapped. By referring to the divergent viewpoints of young females who have accompanied the sanitarium’s residents for years, elderly residents and health care workers from the Mainland – along with fictionalized political prisoners – Realm of Reverberations discusses a key issue, as the incident seems to be “foregone conclusion”: that is, whether “a foregone conclusion” necessarily constitutes “a final outcome”.

Chronobiological sphere (orange)
Chronobiological sphere (orange)

Olafur Eliasson

1 / 1

Chronobiological sphere (orange)

2018

Partially silvered glass sphere, paint (orange), wood

148.5×40×40 cm

The appearance of each of these glass spheres is unstable: continually slipping between clarity, colour, and blackness. These works are an example of Eliasson’s on-going experimentation with the use of partly-coloured glass spheres to create works that respond dynamically to the viewer’s investigation and movement, creating a direct connection between perception and activity. As the philosopher Alva Noë has written, ‘Art doesn’t activate us… rather, it gives us an opportunity to activate it, to switch it on and make it happen.’

Rainbow assembly
Rainbow assembly

Olafur Eliasson

1 / 1

Rainbow assembly

2016

Spotlights, water, nozzles, wood, hose, pump

Variable dimensions

A circular curtain of mist inside a darkened space is illuminated from within by a ring of spotlights that cause shimmering rainbows to appear on the circle’s inward-facing side. The shimmering colours visible in the curtain of softly falling water are not present in the mist itself, but are seen there when rays of light are refracted and reflected by the droplets of water and meet a viewer’s eye at a particular angle. The work is thus incomplete until someone comes along to close the circuit by moving into a position from which the colours can be seen. Eliasson’s works depend on the viewer’s engagement; the artist makes frequently use of phenomena like reflections and afterimages that are absent in the artworks themselves but produced when the artwork is viewed. This work is an evolution of one of Eliasson’s most important early works: Beauty, from 1993.

The blind pavilion
The blind pavilion

Olafur Eliasson

1 / 1

The blind pavilion

2003

Wood, steel, paint, glass (black and transparent)

250×750×750 cm

Two concentric steel framework structures, glazed with angular panes of clear glass and black glass, form The blind pavilion. When visitors stand at the centre of the work, the black glass panels line up so that the view out of the pavilion into the world beyond is obstructed, and one could say that the pavilion ‘goes blind’. The structure was originally exhibited at the Venice Biennale in 2003, when Eliasson represented Denmark. It was installed on the roof of the Danish pavilion as part of a sequence of works that mixed the views of the exterior environment with the interior exhibition space to test the boundaries between inside and outside. Before finding its permanent home at the Red Brick Art Museum, The blind pavilion was also exhibited on Videy Island, Iceland, and on Peacock Island, Berlin.

The unspeakable openness of things
The unspeakable openness of things

Olafur Eliasson

1 / 1

The unspeakable openness of things

2018

Mirror foil, monofrequency lights, aluminium, paint (white, black)

450×900×12 cm

A large ring seems to cross the boundary between physical space of the room and the room’s reflection in a vast mirror that covers the ceiling. The light emitted by the ring, produced by monofrequency lamps, reduces all colours to a range of yellowish grey tones that sharpens viewers’ visual perception. These lights, often used to illuminate tunnels for enhanced safety, appear in many of Eliasson’s works, including The weather project at Tate Modern, London, in 2003.

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